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The Cothon is a unique district of the Phoenician civilization in Civilization VI: Gathering Storm. It replaces the Harbor and must be built on a Coast or Lake tile next to land.

  • Effects:
    • Lower Civ6Production Production cost (27 vs. 54).
    • +50% Civ6Production Production towards naval units and Settlers in this city.
    • All wounded naval units in the city's borders heal +100 HP each turn.
    • Receives Major Bonus (+2 Civ6Gold Gold) for being adjacent to the City Center, Standard Bonus (+1 Civ6Gold Gold) per each adjacent Sea resource, Minor bonus (+0.5 Civ6Gold Gold) per each adjacent District.
    • +1 Admiral6 Great Admiral point per turn.
    • Allows for sea lane TradeRoute6 Trade Route (even if the district is still under construction).
    • Allows its parent city to build ships, even if the City Center is inland.
    • Newly produced or purchased ships will spawn at the Cothon tile (as long as the Cothon tile is unoccupied).
    • Removes Civ6Movement Movement penalties for units Embarking to and from its tile (even if the district is still under construction).
    • Allows its parent city to build Ships requiring Strategic Resources with only 1 count of the relevant resource.
    • When the Seaport is built, the parent city may construct Fleets and Armadas.
    • Buildings grant experience bonuses to ships built in this city.
    • Specialists add +2 Civ6Gold Gold and +1 Civ6Food Food each.
    • Pillaging Cothon yields Civ6Gold Gold.

BuildingsEdit

The following buildings can be constructed in a Cothon:

ProjectsEdit

StrategyEdit

An extremely powerful unique district, nearly all of Phoenician might revolves around this district. It should be the absolute first district to be erected whenever a new city is founded (maybe except for your original Capital6 Capital, where you can go Government Plaza and then Cothon, in order to build the Cothon much faster). Besides the bonus towards building Settlers, any Phoenician cities with the Cothon can churn out a massive armada of immortal boats and ships, who can all heal in only a turn, rendering any attempt at naval domination against Phoenicia fruitless and generally, foolish. This district also poses a threat to the Phoenician neighbors as their ships can be built in quick order and can be sent home to heal extremely quickly. These newly conquered cities may come with their own Harbors on water-dominated maps, which will then turn into new Cothons, making them new bases for shipbuilding and quick healing.

City Patron Goddess pantheon, or to a lesser extent Reyna's Contractor title (since it is rather clunky to keep moving her around), is a fantastic pickup for the Phoenicians to, as quickly as possible, erect this almighty district.

Civilopedia entryEdit

The word “cothon” is Greek for “drinking vessel,” and describes the circular shape of the artificial harbors created by the Phoenicians. There are surviving examples of these today in Sicily, Tunisia, and Cyprus. The best-known example may have been the one at Carthage.

The cothon consisted of two sections: A long, rectangular outer harbor for merchant traffic, which led to a circular inner harbor for warships. The outer harbor's quays would have been busy places, and the cothon at Carthage was reputedly capable of supporting hundreds of ships at a time. Each night, the mouth of the harbor would have been secured with an iron chain for security.

The inner, military harbor, was a protected and secure facility to build, repair, and outfit the Phoenician naval vessels for war. The inner harbor had an artificial island at the center for the commanding admiral. The outer ring of the military harbor would have contained slipways for ships, as well as naval stores and material for the repair and construction of new ships. The ancient writer Appian describes the Carthaginian military harbor as ringed by Ionic columns, “giving it the appearance of a continuous portico to both the harbor and the island.”

The cothon was an integral part of the Phoenician dominance of the Mediterranean. Ships are expensive to build and maintain, and the construction of these specialized, sophisticated facilities demonstrate the Phoenician's commitment to ruling the seas.

GalleryEdit

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