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== Civilopedia Entry ==
 
== Civilopedia Entry ==
 
Eyjafjallajökull is the name for both an Icelandic volcano and the ice cap plugging its caldera. Though the volcano has remained active for over a millennia, it was little known outside of Iceland until a minor eruption in 2010. Its subsequent ash cloud halted air traffic in Europe for nearly a week and spawned thousands of hours of breathless news reports. Eyjafjallajökull's eruptions have traditionally predicted even larger eruptions of the nearby Katla, a far more active subglacial volcano—much to the chagrin of European air traffic controllers.
 
Eyjafjallajökull is the name for both an Icelandic volcano and the ice cap plugging its caldera. Though the volcano has remained active for over a millennia, it was little known outside of Iceland until a minor eruption in 2010. Its subsequent ash cloud halted air traffic in Europe for nearly a week and spawned thousands of hours of breathless news reports. Eyjafjallajökull's eruptions have traditionally predicted even larger eruptions of the nearby Katla, a far more active subglacial volcano—much to the chagrin of European air traffic controllers.
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[[Category:Natural Wonders (Civ6)]]

Revision as of 19:58, December 22, 2016

Eyjafjallajökull is a Natural Wonder in Civilization VI.

"A number of stones rolled down the mountain, followed by an enormous and lofty column of flame, which allowed people in Holt to read as perfectly at night as if it had been day." - Liverpool Mercury

Description

Adjacent land plots yield +1 Culture and +2 Food.

Civilopedia Entry

Eyjafjallajökull is the name for both an Icelandic volcano and the ice cap plugging its caldera. Though the volcano has remained active for over a millennia, it was little known outside of Iceland until a minor eruption in 2010. Its subsequent ash cloud halted air traffic in Europe for nearly a week and spawned thousands of hours of breathless news reports. Eyjafjallajökull's eruptions have traditionally predicted even larger eruptions of the nearby Katla, a far more active subglacial volcano—much to the chagrin of European air traffic controllers.

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