FANDOM


BackArrowGreen Back to the list of units
     

Fair-use-wikipedia-logo
Wikipedia has a page called:

The Jong is a unique naval ranged unit of the Indonesian civilization in Civilization VI. It replaces the Frigate and is unlocked with Mercenaries.

  • Attributes:
    • Higher Civ6Production Production cost (300 vs. 280).
    • Higher Civ6Movement Movement (5 vs. 4).
    • When in formation, +5 Civ6StrengthIcon Combat Strength and shares its Civ6Movement Movement with all units in the formation.
    • No strategic resource requirement.

Strategy Edit

While it takes a little longer to build than the Frigate, the Jong becomes available sooner, moves faster, and is great as an escort unit. Any land units and/or Great Admirals in formation with it can take advantage of its fast Civ6Movement Movement to traverse oceans with ease, while also increasing its Civ6StrengthIcon Combat Strength. The Indonesians can use a fleet of Jongs to transport an invasion force overseas, or drop off Missionaries and Apostles to spread their religion to foreign cities.

Of course, you will need to research Cartography before the Jong can enter Ocean tiles! Don't forget that having a next-generation ship doesn't automatically mean that it can move freely in the ocean, and it being unlocked with a civic instead of the normal tech development also means that it is fully possible the Indonesians will get access to it before they've advanced sufficiently in the tech tree to unlock its full potential. Without Cartography, the Jong is constrained to coastal waters, and its movement may get easily blocked by lesser ships or national borders.

Civilopedia entry Edit

If you wish to dominate the high seas, confront the enemy with overwhelming force. This was the philosophy behind the massive jong ships, the schooner of the Majapahit. This vessel allowed the Empire to control Javanese waters through a combination of size and strength.

The Majapahit sailing vessels differentiated themselves from Chinese junks with the addition of a second rudder, which made the 600 ton jong fast yet easy to control. This wasn't the only extra maneuverability option for the jong; if the winds were low, a row of oarsmen could move the schooner beyond the range of enemy fire or around seaborne obstacles.

While primarily used as merchant ships, jongs also served as military transports. All of that weight wasn't just for show: the addition of four-layer wooden masts offered protection against incoming cannon fire, and a jong under attack could return the favor with its own opposing ordnance.

Trivia Edit

  • The Jong's model is more closely based on the Borobudur ship than an actual jong. There is no historical report or depiction of jongs with double outriggers or propelled by oars.

Gallery Edit

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.