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Lakes are a terrain feature in Civilization VI. They are found throughout the world, formed by several water tiles completely surrounded by land.

StrategyEdit

A relatively small (up to 9 tiles) expanse of shallow water which is surrounded entirely by land is considered a Lake. Their main function is to provide a source of fresh water for cities founded next to them (or connected to them via an Aqueduct); this is also their main differential from Coast. However, if they are big enough, they will almost always have at least one sea resource and can thus be explored just like seas and oceans.

The Huey Teocalli Wonder is specifically designed to enhance Lakes. It adds +1 Civ6Food Food and Civ6Production Production to all Lake tiles for a total yield of 2 Civ6Food Food, 1 Civ6Production Production and 1 Civ6Gold Gold, plus any additional bonuses from Resources (and bonus Amenities6 Amenities for the city which built it)!

Note that Harbors can still be built on Lakes, and units may embark there. Of course, since Lakes are by definition landlocked, it doesn't make much sense to Embark units just to cross one, instead of going around it by land, unless otherwise blocked such as by a Mountain.

In Rise and Fall you can build the new Water Park district in a Lake. This is especially useful for single-tile Lakes, which are of little use otherwise. The Water Park with its special buildings and wider effect could be a better alternative than the Entertainment Complex.

Woods and Rainforests cannot be found next to Lakes (for unknown reasons). Also, Builders cannot plant Woods next to Lakes.

In Gathering Storm the new Canal district will allow connecting lakes in suitable locations to the open ocean, or to any nearby body of water.

Lake Names Edit

Gathering Storm introduced a new mechanic in which Lakes can have different names based on the first civilization that finds them. Below is the list of the names and civilization of origin:

Lakes Civilization Notes
Agua Vermelha Brazil
Altyevatnet Norway Appears to be a misspelling of Altevatnet, which lies in the county of Troms og Finnmark in Northern Norway. Also known as Álddesjávri in Northern Sámi, it covers nearly 80km2.
aManzamnyama Zulu
Aral Sea Russia, Scythia
Baengnokdam Korea
Bakhtegan Lake Persia
Bassenthwaite Lake England
Blåsjø Norway Covering 84.48km2 in the counties of Agder and Rogaland, this lake is artificial, formed by the Ulla-Førre hydropower complex, which consists of three hydroelectric power stations: Kvilldal, Saurdal and Hylen.
Boeung Kak Khmer
Bourget Lake France
Budi Lake Mapuche
Buwełno Lake Poland
Caburgua Lake Mapuche
Chao Lake China
Chinchayqucha Inca
Conison Lake England
Dąbie Lake Poland
Dal Lake India
Derwentwater Lake England
Dipor Bil India
Dobskie Lake Poland
Doiran Lake Greece, Macedon
Dongting Lake China
El Bricial Spain
Feldges Lake America
Femunden Norway Norway's third largest lake, located in the counties of Innlandet and Trøndelag. Covers 203.52km2 and once marked the border with Sweden.
Fucine Lake Rome
Galletué Lake Mapuche
Great Bear Lake Canada
Great Bitter Lake Arabia, Egypt
Great Salt Lake America
Great Slave Lake Canada
Greenlee Lough England
Guarapiranga Brazil
Hamun Lake Persia
Hawr as Sa'diyah Sumer
Heaven Lake Korea
Hjälmaren Sweden
Hongze Lake China
Hornindalsvatnet Norway Located in the Møre og Romsdal and Vestland counties, this is Norway's and Europe's deepest lake, measuring at a depth of 514 metres. Covers 51km2.
Hulun Lake China, Mongolia
Ichkeul Lake Phoenicia
Iliamna Lake America
Issyk-Kul Lake Scythia
Kartsakhi Lake Georgia
Khar-Us Lake Mongolia
Khövsgöl Lake Mongolia
Khyargas Lake Mongolia
Kilunda Lake Kongo
Kolleru Lake India
Königssee Germany
Kosi Lake Zulu
Lac de Grand-Lieu France
Lagoa dos Patos Brazil
Lake Aðapaskāw Cree
Lake Aiguebelette France
Lake Alakol Scythia
Lake Amadeus Australia
Lake Amatitlán Mayan
Lake Ammer Germany
Lake Annecy France
Lake Antogo Mali
Lake Aougoundou Mali
Lake Baikal Russia
Lake Balaton Hungary
Lake Balkhash Scythia
Lake Bardawil Egypt
Lake Benacus Rome
Lake Beyşehir Ottomans
Lake Biwa Japan
Lake Bolsena Rome
Lake Bracciano Rome
Lake Bujon Korea
Lake Burdur Ottomans
Lake Carnegie Australia
Lake Chalco Aztec
Lake Champlain America, Canada
Lake Chiemsee Germany
Lake Chon Korea
Lake Constance Germany
Lake Copais Greece
Lake Débo Mali
Lake Disappointment Australia
Lake Egirdir Ottomans
Lake Enol Spain
Lake Ercina Spain
Lake Erie America, Canada
Lake Eyre Australia
Lake Faguibine Mali
Lake Fertő Hungary
Lake Frome Australia
Lake Geneva France
Lake Gopło Poland
Lake Grevelingen Netherlands
Lake Güija Mayan
Lake Habbaniyah Sumer
Lake Hammar Sumer
Lake Hauroko Māori
Lake Herrera Gran Colombian
Lake Hévíz Hungary
Lake Huron America, Canada
Lake Idku Egypt
Lake IJssel Netherlands
Lake Inawashiro Japan
Lake Iseo Rome
Lake Izabal Mayan
Lake Iznik Ottomans
Lake Karla Greece
Lake Kasumigaura Japan
Lake Kawaguchi Japan
Lake Khanka China, Russia
Lake Khasan Korea
Lake Koroneia Greece, Macedon
Lake Kummerow Germany
Lake Ladoga Russia
Lake Larius Rome
Lake Leopoldo Gran Colombian
Lake Louise Canada
Lake Mackay Australia
Lake Mai-Ndombe Kongo
Lake Mamry Poland
Lake Manapouri Māori
Lake Manzala Egypt
Lake Mariout Egypt
Lake Marken Netherlands
Lake Matano Indonesia
Lake Mer-Wer Egypt
Lake Michigan America
Lake Mistassini Canada
Lake Müritz Germany
Lake Nakaumi Japan
Lake Nhlabane Zulu
Lake Niangay Mali
Lake Niegocin Poland
Lake Nipigon Canada
Lake of Banyoles Spain
Naarden Lake Netherlands
Lake of the Woods America, Canada
Lake Okeechobee America
Lake Onega Russia
Lake Ontario America, Canada
Lake Paliastomi Georgia
Lake Peipus Russia
Lake Petén Itzá Mayan
Lake Poso Indonesia
Lake Prespa Greece, Macedon
Lake Pukaki Māori
Lake Puwpu Inca
Lake Rotoiti Māori
Lake Rotomahana Māori
Lake Rotorua Māori
Lake Saint Lucia Zulu
Lake Schwerin Germany
Lake Sentarum Indonesia
Lake Shinji Japan
Lake Sibhayi Zulu
Lake Starnberg Germany
Lake Superior America, Canada
Lake Szelid Hungary
Lake Tahoe America
Lake Tai China, Scythia
Lake Taupo Māori
Lake Taymyr Russia
Lake Texcoco Aztec
Lake Te Anau Māori
Lake Titiqaqa Inca
Lake Toba Indonesia
Lake Torrens Australia
Lake Tota Gran Colombian
Lake Towuti Indonesia
Lake Trasimene Rome
Lake Trichonida Greece
Lake Tumba Kongo
Lake Tuz Ottomans
Lake Urmia Persia
Lake Valencia Gran Colombian
Lake Van Ottomans
Lake Vegoritida Greece, Macedon
Lake Velence Hungary
Lake Verbanus Rome
Lake Vistonida Greece, Macedon
Lake Volvi Greece, Macedon
Lake Waikaremoana Māori
Lake Wakatipu Māori
Lake Walchen Germany
Lake Wanaka Māori
Lake Wigry Poland
Lake Windermere England
Lake Winnebago America
Lake Winnipeg Canada, Cree
Lake Winnipegosis Cree
Lake Xaltocan Aztec
Lake Xochimilco Aztec
Lake Yeak Laom Khmer
Lake Zumpango Aztec
Laguna de la Cocha Gran Colombian
Lauwers Lake Netherlands
Limingen Norway Covers 94km2 and is located in the municipalities of Røyrvik and Lierne in Trøndelag county. Also known as Lyjmede in Southern Sámi.
Loch Awe Scotland
Loch Coruisk Scotland
Loch Finlaggan Scotland
Loch Lomond Scotland
Loch Maree Scotland
Loch Morar Scotland
Loch Ness Scotland
Loch Tay Scotland
Loktak Lake India
Łuknajno Lake Poland
Maharloo Lake Persia
Mälaren Sweden
Mallalafquén Mapuche
Mjøsa Norway Norway's largest lake, located in the counties of Viken and Innlandet, covering 362km2. The cities of Lillehammer, Gjøvik and Hamar are all located along the shores of this lake, and it contains Norway's largest freshwater island, Helgøya. Water transport on Mjøsa was once vital for the settlements on its shores, but this was replaced by the eventual construction of railways.
Møsvatnet Norway More commonly known as simply Møsvatn, this lake is located in the municipality of Vinje in Vestfold og Telemark county, and lies at 919 metres above sea level, not far away from the Hardangervidda plateau. Its primary outflow, the river Måna, serves as the primary inflow for another lake on Norway's list of names: Tinnsjøen.
Mundaú Lagoon Brazil
Namak Lake Persia
Nisser Norway Located in the municipality of Nissedal (which derives its name from the lake) in Vestfold og Telemark county. Covering 76.3km2, the lake's name is identical to the indefinitive plural form of the word nisse, which is the name of a short, gnome-like creature in Scandinavian mythology. However, the lake's name is etymologically unrelated to the creature.
Norsjø Norway Located in the municipalities of Skien, Nome and Sauherad in Vestfold og Telemark county. Covers 55.48km2 and is part of the Telemark Canal.
Oreti Lake Georgia
Oros Lake Brazil
Øyeren Norway Covers 84.74km2 and is located in the municipalities of Enebakk, Lillestrøm, Rælingen, Spydeberg and Trøgstad in Viken county. Glomma, the longest river in Norway, creates Northern Europe's largest inland river delta in this lake as it passes through it. The lake's name (Øyir in Old Norse) is derived from the word øy - "island" or "flat and fertile land along a waterside" - referring to the flat islands that make up this delta.
Pallqaqucha Inca
Pangong Tso India
Paravani Lake Georgia
Pariwanaqucha Inca
Plauer See Germany
Poyang Lake China
Qinghai Lake China
Reindeer Lake Canada, Cree
Represa de Eng Souza Dias Brazil
Rinihue Lake Mapuche
Røssvatnet Norway Norway's second largest lake, located in the municipalities of Hattfjelldal and Hemnes in Nordland county. It is also a reservoir, and covers 218.61km2. Had it not been for the dams that regulate its volume, it would have covered 190km2, and would only have been Norway's third largest lake. Also known as Reevhtse in Southern Sámi.
Saaler Bodden Germany
Samji Lake Korea
Sanabria Lake Spain
Sarygamysh Lake Scythia
Schaalsee Germany
Sea of Galilee Arabia, Phoenicia
Selbusjøen Norway Lies primarily in the municipality of Selbu (which takes its name from this lake) in Trøndelag county, but a small part of it is located within Trondheim's municipal borders, with the lake lying southeast of the city itself. Covers 58.26km2.
Shuswap Lake Canada
Snåsavatnet Norway Located in the municipalities of Snåsa and Steinkjer in Trøndelag county. Covers 122km2.
Śniardwy Poland
Steinhuder Meer Germany
Storsjön Sweden
Tabatskuri Lake Georgia
Te waihora Māori
Tinnsjøen Norway Covers 51.43km2 and is located in the municipalities of Tinn and Notodden in Vestfold og Telemark county. Most famous for being the final resting place of the SF Hydro, a steam-powered railway ferry sunk by the Norwegian resistance during World War II, as part of the heavy water sabotage. The shipment of heavy water that was intended for Germany remains at the bottom of the lake to this day.
Tonle Bati Lake Khmer
Tonlé Sap Khmer
Tyrifjorden Norway Covers 139km2, and is located in the municipalities of Hole, Lier, Modum and Ringerike in Viken county, 40km northwest of Oslo. Despite what the name implies, it is commonly not regarded as a fjord.
Ullswater Lake England
Utikuma Lake Cree
Uvs Lake Mongolia
Vänern Sweden
Vättern Sweden
Vembanad Lake India
Wabamun Lake Cree
Wakaw Lake Cree
Waskesiu Lake Cree
West Lake China
West Nubian Lake Nubia
Wojnowo Lake Poland
Wollaston Lake Cree
Yanaqucha Inca

GalleryEdit

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