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Monarchy is a social policy in Civilization V. It is part of the Tradition tree and requires Legalism.

The development of the mature form of feudalism, the Monarchy, turns the center of imperial power into a shining jewel of civilized life. A single ruler, a splendid king or queen now concentrates all the attention and admiration of his or her subjects, centralizing most entertainment, culture and even commerce.

Game Info[]

  • +1 Gold Gold and -1 Unhappiness (Civ5).png Unhappiness for every 2 20xPopulation5.png Citizens in the Capital Capital.

Strategy[]

This level 3 Policy is a great all-around bonus, giving an immediate boost, as well as subsequent bonuses as the 20xPopulation5.png Population of your Capital increases (as it should, thanks to the other Policies in the tree). The only consideration to make is whether you should adopt it before or after Landed Elite. Because the latter has a truly outstanding long-term bonus, it is usually better to adopt it first; if you're strapped for cash, however, or in trouble with your 20xHappiness5.png Happiness, Monarchy will greatly help you. Again, the more citizens in your Capital, the greater the immediate effect!

As it affects happiness and therefore expansion potential, it is one of the longer lasting policies from the two early policy trees. It contrasts with Meritocracy from the Tradition tree, which is proportional to the population as a whole (instead of just the Capital Capital).

Civilopedia entry[]

Monarchy is a form of government where power is vested in an individual. Often, but not always, power passes to the monarch's heir upon the current ruler's death. (There are some elected monarchies, but not many.) Monarchy is similar to despotism, but with one important difference: the monarch rules within the state's laws, while a despot is above all law. It is of course quite possible for a monarch to be a despot - but it is also possible for a monarch to be part of a political process which allows the people a good deal of freedom. Great Britain would be an example of the latter.

Civilization V Social Policies [edit]
Tradition

AristocracyLanded EliteLegalismMonarchyOligarchy

Liberty

CitizenshipCollective RuleMeritocracyRepresentationRepublic

Honor

DisciplineMilitary CasteMilitary TraditionProfessional ArmyWarrior Code

Piety

Free ReligionMandate of HeavenOrganized ReligionReformationReligious ToleranceTheocracy

Patronage

AestheticsConsulatesCultural DiplomacyEducated EliteMerchant ConfederacyPhilanthropyScholasticism

Commerce

EntrepreneurshipMercantilismMercenary ArmyMerchant NavyNaval TraditionProtectionismTrade Unions Wagon Trains

Rationalism

Free ThoughtHumanismScientific RevolutionSecularismSovereignty

Aesthetics

Artistic GeniusCultural CentersCultural Exchange Fine ArtsFlourishing of the Arts

Exploration

Maritime InfrastructureMerchant NavyNaval TraditionNavigation SchoolTreasure Fleets

Freedom

Civil SocietyConstitutionDemocracyFree SpeechUniversal Suffrage

Autocracy

FascismMilitarismPolice StatePopulismTotal War

Order

CommunismNationalismPlanned EconomySocialismUnited Front

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