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The Tsikhe is a unique building of the Georgian civilization in Civilization VI: Rise and Fall. It is built in the City Center and replaces the Renaissance Walls.

StrategyEdit

The Tsikhe can be built faster than the Renaissance Walls and yields Civ6Faith Faith in addition to its defensive bonuses. In Rise and Fall, it is widely considered to be the worst unique infrastructure in the game, as it replaces a building that players rarely want to build in the first place, and its uniqueness is hilariously trivial compared to the standard version. You may want to build at least one Tsikhe just to get the +4 Era Score, but even then, you may want to run Limes while doing so - despite its lower Civ6Production Production cost, it's hard to justify spending 10+ turns constructing this building.

In Gathering Storm, the Tsikhe receives a much needed buff. It now provides twice the outer defense of the standard Renaissance Walls, turning Georgian cities into impenetrable fortresses. Moreover, it plays strongly to the Georgian unique ability of chaining multiple Golden Ages. Considering that this is the only City Center unique building (meaning that it can be built in every city), combined with Tamar's leader ability, you are looking at a significant Civ6Faith Faith and Tourism6 Tourism output as long as you can continue your Golden Ages.

Valletta's Suzerain bonus has good synergy with Georgia, since it allows the Tsikhe and other City Center buildings to be purchased with Civ6Faith Faith. This city-state is the best reason to build more than one Tsikhe in Rise and Fall (since Medieval Walls are good enough fortifications until Steel is unlocked), and an amazing facilitator in Gathering Storm when the Tsikhe is a solid building on its own.

Civilopedia entryEdit

High over the landscape, situated in the hills and rocky cliffs, the Georgian fortresses guard the countryside. The tsikhe feature high curtain walls with either rounded or triangular merlons (the solid part of the “cut outs” on the wall). A tower stands at each intersection of joined wall.

The Georgian fortresses were particularly difficult to assault due to their position on the high ground. Although this type of fortress existed during the time of Alexander the Great, the Georgians used them effectively through the 17th Century.

GalleryEdit